Korean Journal of Cerebrovascular Surgery 1999;1(1):56-63.
Published online January 1, 2001.
Management of Intracranial Small AVM.
Han, Dae Hee , Choe, Woo Jin , Kwon, O Ki
Department of Neurosurgery, College of Medicine, Seoul National University, Seoul, Korea.
Abstract
For the management of small intracranial arteriovenous malformation(AVM), various methods were proposed and their clinical outcomes have been analyzed. Microsurgery, radiosurgery, and embolization can be effective for the treatment of small AVM. Small AVM is known to be at a higher risk of bleeding. Therefore, the aim of treatment should be the prevention of neurological deterioration from bleeding. Microsurgery has the advantage of prompt elimination of the risk of rebleeding by complete excision with single procedure. With the advance of microsurgical techniques, small AVM can be cured with minimal neurological deficit. Outcome of microsurgery depends on location, size, and numbers and patterns of draining veins, which mean Spetzler-Martin grades. Stereotactic device guided surgery, preoperative careful evaluation, intraoperative electrophysiological and hemodynamic monitoring, and experienced surgical skills can greatly reduce adverse brain injury and help complete and exact excision of malformations. Radiosurgery has its unique role for the deep seated AVM, but long term outcome remains to be evaluated. In the management of small AVM, surgery should be considered as the first line of treatment, and radiosurgery can be an alternative for the surgically inaccessible lesions.
Key Words: Small AVM, Microsurgery, Radiosurgery


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